(Source: purenting, via naturalmomma)

Palaeontology ≠ Archaeology

theolduvaigorge:

biologizeable:

Archaeology ≠ Palaeontology

  1. Palaeontology ≠ Archaeology
  2. Archaeology = Palaeontology
  3. Palaeontology ≠ Archaeology

Archaeology ≠ Palaeontology

  • PALAEONTOLOGY ARCHAEOLOGY

I’ve already explained in depth why this sort of X≠Y…

pinkypyro:


kevinsanoposts:

Six hundred goddamn AD

Six hundred. Goddamn AD

pinkypyro:

kevinsanoposts:

Six hundred goddamn AD

Six hundred. Goddamn AD

(Source: hadeiadel, via my-tormented-soul)

No excuses. Zilch.
Source: Unschool Universe

No excuses. Zilch.

Source: Unschool Universe

Give your child *real* life
Take them out of school
Via Unschool Universe

Give your child *real* life
Take them out of school

Via Unschool Universe

Oh, if he brings up the grades, tell him that you personally don’t believe in them. Grades don’t measure learning, really. Then, talk about stuff that he loves and is good at. Ask him what he wants to see, do, experience, play. Tell him that when grownups do the things that grownups do, very rarely are they graded, so why should kids be?

Kathryn Baptista (via unschoolquotearama)

We don’t clean up messes to have a clean house. We clean up messes so there is room for more mess!

Now I think of cleaning up after my kids as replacing a canvas. I do it with the thought that by giving them room again and a bare floor and organized toys to pick from I’m handing them the tools to write another mess onto our house. It’s meant that at the end of a day, or sometimes a few days in a row, I just let the mess stay, because really, it’s a work of art or a story. Maybe it isn’t finished. Maybe it’s too interesting to be gotten rid of so soon. It also clears up my feelings of resentment about doing the bulk of it. I like being the one to reset the house so that we all can live another, different mess the next day.

Dawn (in NS)

from http://sandradodd.com/chores/intro

(via unschoolquotearama)

I’ve slowly been developing this mindset (at least in terms of perfectionism - he takes on household responsibility on his own but still needs to be reminded of his contribution to both fun and helping out every so often).

I don’t really look to other mothers for validation on how I’m doing as a parent. I look to my children and my husband. If they are generally happy, relaxed, comfortable and engaged, I feel pretty good about how I’m doing….

If I see signs of frustration or stress or uneasiness in my family, there are alarm bells going off inside me telling me I need to be kinder, pay extra close attention, have more ideas, and offer more options.

Rippy Dusseldorp (via unschoolquotearama)

Let the Sky Fall

New Years Itch has got me by the ears. I spent the morning organising the kitchen, dismantling the xmas tree, doing loads of washing and cleaning the house like the Queen’s coming. Sash played a variety of math games online.

By the time Pirate Cap and our young lady came home (they stayed over in the forest an extra night so she could play with her friends), the house was sparkling and dessert was being made.

Their lounging around allowed me to do some work on the computer. The kids played next door till it was time for us to meet up with friends at a nearby river.

I hadn’t planned on swimming but the water when we got there was so warm and inviting that it saw me go in skirt and all. The boys all had fun in the water playing somersaults with their dads, and Sash swam to the opposite side of the river with his so he could jump off the 3m cliff he’s been too scared to.

Peer pressure can be a great motivator, because just a few weeks ago Giselle didn’t want to go anywhere near after her first jump, yet today, when faced with continuous group jumps, she didn’t see any other way out.

Sash also wanted to keep up with his friends and the first jump happened remarkably quickly. The second time though is always the hardest, once you get your common sense back, and he chickened out. Next time we’ll all go jump together so he can conquer his fear (says the one who’safraid of heights).

We stayed till high tide completely flood the banks, then sauntered down home. Pirate Captain, due to a gross misunderstanding about keys yesterday, had to walk 12 km yesterday when we went hiring as opposed to my 6, so he promptly fell into a snooze, having been exhausted ever since. He had a major foot operation last year after a boating accident and walking is, quite literally, a pain.

I cooked us supper, then took a beautiful long bath and an even nicer nap outside on the grass. By the time the stars had come out the family came out in drips and drags to check on me; thus paradise was over.

I read Sash the delightful ‘Why Unicorns Eat Lavender’ by Rosemary Kahn again, and after a weird conversation about how quickly you die and why when your head’s been chopped off, we’re ready to hit the sack.

I’m grateful the holiday madness is almost coming to a close; it’s been fun but too much fun in the sun - or elsewhere - is wrecking havoc on my productivity…

That’s one of the single biggest drawbacks of schooling: when every day’s a holiday, you just don’t know how to appreciate the real ones anymore like you used to!

We had just arrived home from a 12+ hour journey in the car. It was after 9pm. Ethan’s first visit was to his computer, where he spent about thirty minutes visiting various interests. Then, after a trip to the washroom, he headed to the kitchen where he began to mix a concoction. I asked him what he was working on, and he said, “A cleaner for the bathroom sink.” His first cleaner didn’t work, he told us. So, he returned to the kitchen to make another. After a short time at the bathroom sink, he came to find us, feeling victorious in his personal accomplishment. The sink truly sparkled. Next, I found him cleaning off the surface of his desk. Once done with that, he asked for my phone, wherein he proceeded to enter $1.50 into Kidsbank (which keeps track of his allowances and payed jobs). I smiled and said, “Don’t forget about adding something for cleaning the sink.” He said, “No. I did that just because.” Very interesting considering Ethan has never been given chores to do. I share this not to brag, but as evidence that it is indeed safe to trust in children’s inherent desire to be the best that they can be without enforced parental coercion.

Karen James (via unschoolquotearama)
25 posts!

25 posts!

(Source: assets)